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BIG BEAUTIFUL NOISE
 
A  magazine focused on inventive, progressive, and creative music in any genre that stands out from the rest
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DAVID CROSS / ANDREW BOOKER
Ends Meeting
(2018 - Noisy Records - EU)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHn1opZEPPc

A translucent communication between two exceptional musicians, that provide lift-off to the listener, not only in a trickle, but with many a climatic trips through the universe. What would one expect from a profound member of 1970's period King Crimson (David Cross - electric violin), plus a member of Sanguine Hum, Tim Bowness, No-Man, Henry Fool, and drummer for Peter Bank's Harmony in Diversity (Andrew Booker - electronic drums)? With Peter Bank, on tour with King Crimson, is where Cross and Booker met. (Booker also has one solo EP from 1996 called 'Ahead'). Cross has an abundance of solo work, guest spots on other band albums, and collaborations that make a wondrous pathway of his skills.

This recording ('Ends Meeting') actually took place back place back in 2006, but was not released until 2018. An all instrumental project, with 7 tracks, that feature this pair, may seem simple on the surface, but just one listen and you will discover a very rich and beautiful set of compositions. The music has multiple textures, and sounds more like a 5 piece band (due to the abilities of electronics and programming), and is very well developed. Parts are meditative, however, not in the conventional "ambient" manner. For instance, Cross uses numerous effects on his violin to simulate lead guitar, and other stringed instruments. Booker shows his technical know how with artful drum and percussion programming. So the production and multiple layers are done with ease, including keyboards. No limits are seen here between the two progressive rock masters.

The music has plenty of celestial atmosphere, augmented by the unearthly playfulness of some of what Jon Hassell did (take away the trumpet of course), perhaps what Fripp & Eno would have done with an addition of electronic percussion, and open skies of electronic voyages in the realm of early Gandalf (Austria) or the more space induced music Didier Lockwood did. All very tasteful, fully realized, and way worthy of your attention and support.

  ©Reviewed by Lee Henderson 2 - 2 - 2018